Tag Archives: Ietionia

Ietionia Gate

Ietionia Gate, part of the City Gates along with the City and the Middle Gate, situated on the hill Kastraki, on the southern part of the port of Piraeus, was built in 411 BC and owes its name to Ietionia Coast which, according to various sources had probably been conquered by Ietion, a hero of the land of Attica (700 BC). As the rest of the City Gates, Ietionia Gate is part of the Long Walls, and played a major role in the general fortification project conceived by Themistocles. Built on the rocky hills of Ietionia, this part of the walls was of primary importance, as it protected the city and its ports by … < Read More >

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SS Hellas Liberty – A Museum Ship in Piraeus

A special class of steam-powered cargo ships constructed during WWII, under the directive to supply the Allied Forces, eventually came to be known as ‘Liberty Ships’. 2.710 such vessels were built in eighteen shipyards in the US and though they were British in conception, several modifications were adopted in order to make the vessels larger, yet cheaper and easier to build. ‘Liberty Ships’ have since become the symbol of the US American wartime industrial output. Approximately 2.400 ‘Liberty Ships’ survived WWII, and more than 800 of them were used as post-war cargo/merchant ships. Of the remaining … < Read More >

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Themistocles’ Tomb – a Monument in Piraeus Industrial Zone

Themistocles’ Tomb is located in Drapetsona, a suburb along the Piraeus port coastline, overlooking Kinosoura and Psitallia, right opposite the spot where the Naval Battle of Salamis – a benchmark in all Western world’s history and a personal achievement of Themistocles himself- took place. Themistocles’ tomb was found in the yard of a chemical and fertilizer factory, widely known in Greece as “Lipasmata” (Greek word for “fertilizers”). For as long the factory was in operation, no action to preserve the tomb had been taken and of course there was no access to it. In 1999 the factory closed down and since then … < Read More >

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Electric Railway Museum of Piraeus

The Electric Railway Museum of Piraeus had been the vision of an employee of the Athens – Piraeus Electric Railways, Manolis Fotopoulos, who began to realize his dream right after his retirement, in 1995. He diligently searched in all company locations, warehouses and even junk-yards and gathered all items he considered important for the future Museum, prompting at the same time his co-workers – retired or still active – to contribute to his effort. Finally, in the space of the former Post Office within the architecturally unique Piraeus railway station building, the Electric Railway Museum of Piraeus has been … < Read More >

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